FOURTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST 

24 06 2020

COMMEMORATION OF ALL THE SAINTS OF RUS’-UKRAINE

JUNE 28, 2020

Saturday, June 27        

4:00 PM       ✞Mary Ambrose – Don & Donna Winsock 

Sunday, June 28                  FOURTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST

8:30 AM                    God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioner

Monday, June 29 FEAST OF SS PETER AND PAUL – HOLY DAY OF OBLIGATION

9:00 AM God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioners

Anointing with Holy Oil Myrovania 

Tania Blanco God’s Blessing and Good Health by Ulana Campbell

Saturday, July 4              

           4:00 PM     ✞Eugene Slabinski – Irene Pstrak and sons

Sunday, July 5                  FIFTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST

8:30 AM                God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioners

   ☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸

The Lives of Saints Peter and Paul

THE HOLY APOSTLE PETER

    The son of Jonah and brother of Andrew the First-Called, of the tribe of Simeon and the town of Bethsaida, he was a fisherman and was at first called Simon Peter, but the Lord was pleased to call him Peter, or Cephas (Jn 1:42). He was the first of the disciples to give clear expression to the faith, saying: “You are the Christ, the Son of the Living God” (Mt 16:16). His love for the Lord was very strong, and his faith in Him went from strength to strength. 

    When the Lord was put on trial, Peter denied him three times, but it needed only one look into the face of the Lord, and Peter’s soul was filled with shame and repentance. After the descent of the Holy Spirit, Peter became a fearless and powerful preacher of the Gospel. After his sermon in Jerusalem, about 3,000 souls were converted to the Faith. He preached the Gospel throughout Palestine and Asia Minor, in Italy and Illyria. He performed many wonders, healing the sick and raising the dead, and even when only his shadow fell on the sick. He had a major struggle with Simon the Magician, who declared himself to be from God but was actually a servant of the devil. Peter finally put him to shame and overcame him. 

    Peter was condemned to death on the order of the wicked Emperor Nero, a friend of Simon’s. After installing Linus as Bishop of Rome and exhorting and encouraging the flock of Christ there, Peter went to his death with joy. When he saw the cross before him, he asked the executioner to crucify him upside-down, because he felt himself unworthy to die in the same way as his Lord. And so this great servant of the greatest Master went to his rest and received a crown of eternal glory. 

THE HOLY APOSTLE PAUL 

   Born in Tarsus and of the tribe of Benjamin, he was formerly called Saulus Paulus and studied under Gamaliel. He was a Pharisee and a persecutor of Christians. He was wondrously converted to the Christian faith by the Lord Himself, who appeared to him on the road to Damascus and Jesus said to him, “Why do you persecute Me?”  . He was baptized by the Apostle Ananias, named Paul and enrolled in the work of an Apostle. 

    He preached the Gospel everywhere with burning zeal, from the borders of Arabia to the land of Spain, among both the Jews and Gentiles, and receiving the title of “The Apostle to the Gentiles.” His fearful sufferings were matched only by his fortitude and temperance. Through most of the years of his preaching, he hung from day to day like a thread between life and death. 

    Filling his days and nights with toil and sufferings for Christ, organizing the Church in many places and receiving a high level of perfection, he was able to say: “I live, yet not I but Christ lives in me” (Gal 2:20). He was beheaded in Rome in the reign of Nero, at the same time as St. Peter

Trust Me

“Trust me”, says the Lord,
“I will take care of you
Just as I take care of the little sparrow.
Believe in ME and live this day for it self.
If you do this, you’ll not worry about tomorrow.”

“I hurt when you hurt and cry when you cry
And when you are lonely outstretched is my hand.”

“Only myself and the Father know the number of your days
As well as the number of each grain of sand”.

“Dearly love, just as I love each of you;
Always, Doing so, you express your true love for ME.
Begin each day as if it were a new Life
And when you can no longer bear your burdens;
Let Me!”



Teach Us to Love

O God, perfect us in love, that we may conquer all selfishness and hatred of others; fill our hearts with Thy joy, and shed abroad in them Thy peace which passeth understanding; that so those murmurings and disputing to which we are too prone may be overcome. Make us long-suffering and gentle, and thus subdue our hastiness and angry tempers, and grant that we may bring forth the blessed fruits of the Spirit, to Thy praise and glory, in the name of the Father, and the Son and the Holy Spirt.   Amen.

God’s Alphabet

Always be faithful.
Be the best you can be.
Care for all people.
Don’t just say it; do it.
Each day could be your last – make it count.
Forgive.
Give of yourself.
Help those in need.
Invite God into your life.
Joy is meant for you.
Kindness counts.
Love yourself.
Mean what you say.
Never say things, which are mean.

Open your heart to God’s will.
Pray every day.
Quiet your mind for the answers.
Reach for your dreams.
Say what’s in your heart.
Today is a gift – that’s why it’s called the ‘present’.
Understanding goes a long way.
Vanity doesn’t get you far.
Walk with me.
Xenophobia is fear and hatred of strangers and foreigners – think about it.
You are loved for all time.
Zestfully live each day in My name.

SANCTUARY LIGHT: The Sanctuary light is requested to burn this week 

June 27 – July 4 by Irene Pstrak & sons in loving memory of Joseph Pstak.

Donations: We wish to thank Irene Pstrak & Sons for the donations made to our Building Fund in memory of Eugene Slabinsi and to the Cemetery Fund in loving memory of her husband Joseph Pstrak. Your generosity is greatly appreciated. 

PRAYERS: Our prayer list is published for you to pray for the requests of those in need of Prayers. Place your requests in the collection and the names will be remembered. A request from Rose Mytch to pray for –  Rosemary Morran, Bob Henry, and Alison Mytych. Please say a prayer to day for those in need of God’s blessings. 





THIRD SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST 

22 06 2020

FATHER’S DAY

JUNE 21, 2020

Saturday, June 20               God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Living Fathers

4:00 PM of SS Peter & Paul U.C.C.  and

                 ✞Everlasting Life for all Deceased Fathers of the Parish  

Sunday, June 21                  THIRD SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST 

8:30 AM               God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioners



Wednesday, June 24 THE BIRTH OF ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

Anointing with Myrovania 

9:00 AM ✞Stephen H. Piston – Stephen & Cathy Piston  

Saturday, June 27              

           4:00 PM           ✞Mary Ambrose – Don & Donna Winsock

Sunday, June 28            FOURTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST

8:30 AM            God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioners

let him show you the way

Take Jesus with you

Where ever you may travel.

Take His hand faithfully

And don’t let go.

Let His love lead you,

Guiding you along.

Let His comfort embrace you

And carry you on.

Let His light protect you,

Safely showing the way.

Let His message fill your heart

And encourage you each day.

Let His hand touch you,

Healing all suffering.

Let His forgiveness fill you

And promise recovery.

Let Him walk beside you.

His path will never stray.

He will never forsake you,

Let Him bless your life each day.

Always remember

He Loves You!

FEASTDAY OF THE NATIVITY OF ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

June 24th

Saint John the Baptist, son of Zachary and Elizabeth, is the greatest and last of the prophets. He prepared Israel for the arrival of the Messiah, and therefore is called the Precursor of Christ. He is also known as “Baptist” because he baptized Jesus Christ in the waters of the river Jordan.

This feast dates back to the third century, for Saint Augustine (354-430) said that it was based upon a tradition of the Fathers.

Taken from the Way

Archeparchy News

Father’s Day Greeting Sunday, June 21, 2020

On this joyous day of celebration, the Staff of The Way wishes all the fathers of our readership good health, long life, the Lord’s choicest blessings and salvation of souls. May the Holy Spirit guide them throughout their lives. May the Holy Mother of God and Her Son guard and protect them from all evil. 

Many happy and blessed years!

We also remember all the deceased fathers of our Faithful. We pray for the blessed repose of their souls and that the Lord God forgive all their sins, both voluntary and involuntary. May the Merciful Lord grant them entry into Heaven, the eternal Kingdom of God.  May their memory be eternal.

HAPPY FATHER’S DAY 

A Dad is a person, who is loving and kind,

And often he knows what you have on your mind.

He’s someone who listens, suggests, and defends.

A dad can be one of your very best friends!

He’s proud of your triumphs, but when things go wrong,

A dad can be patient and helpful and strong

In all that you do, a dad’s love plays a part.

There’s always a place for him deep in your heart.

And each year that passes, you’re even more  glad,

More grateful and proud just to call him your dad!

Thank you, Dad…

For listening and caring,

For giving and sharing, but especially, for just being you!

THIRD SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST

JUNE 21, 2020 

SS PETER AND PAUL UKRAINIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

PLYMOUTH, PA

(Matthew 6, 22-33)

The Lord said, “The eye is the lamp of the body. So if your eye is clear, your whole body shall be illuminated: but if your eye is evil, your whole body shall be in darkness. If, Therefore, the light which you have in thee is itself darkness, how great is the darkness!” 

I say to you do not be anxious about your life, what you shall eat or what you shall drink; nor about your body, what you shall wear. Is not life itself a greater gift than food, and the body than the clothing? Look at the birds of the sky, and how 

they neither sow nor reap nor gather grains into barns, and your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of much more value that they? 

Do not therefore worry, saying, ‘What shall we eat’ or ‘What shall we drink’, or, ‘How shall we find clothing?” it is for the heathens to busy themselves over such things; you have a Father in heaven Who knows that you need them all. But seek first the Kingdom of God and His holiness, and all things shall be yours without the asking.”

HISTORY OF FATHER’S DAY

About 4,000 years ago a young boy named Elmusu wished his Babylonian father good health and a long life by carving a Father’s Day message on a card made out of clay. No one knows what happened to Elmesu or his father, but the tradition of having a special day honoring fathers has continued through the years in countries across the world.

The Countries, where the Catholic Church were of significant influence on the culture of the society, Father’s Day is celebrated on St. Joseph’s Day (March 19). However, a more secular celebration which is not associated with any religion is followed in recent times to highlight the increased among people from all over the globe coexisting together in one place.

Father’s Day is celebrated popularly on 3rd Sunday in June in many parts of the world. The idea for creating a day for children to honor their fathers began in Spokane, Washington. A woman by the name of Sonora Smart Dodd thought of the idea for Father’s Day while listening to a Mother’s Day sermon in 1909. Having been raised by her father, Henry Jackson Smart, after her mother died, Sonora wanted her father to know how special he was to her. It was her father that made all the parental sacrifices and was, in the eyes of his daughter, a courageous, selfless, and loving man. Sonora’s father was born in June, so she chose to hold the first Father’s Day celebration in Spokane, Washington on the 19th of June, 1910.

In 1924 President Calvin Coolidge proclaimed the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day. President Nixon, in 1972, established a permanent national observance of Father’s Day to be held on the third Sunday of June. So Father’s Day was born as a token of love and gratitude that a daughter cherishes for her beloved father. Roses are the Father’s Day flowers: red to be worn for a living father and white if the father has died.

SANCTUARY LIGHT: The Sanctuary Light is requested to burn this week June 20 – 27 by Albert Piston in memory of Harry Piston.

CEMETERY: We wish to thank Joan Baury’s for her donation to our parish cemetery.  Her generous donation is greatly appreciated. 

SYMPATHY: We extend our sincere Sympathy to the family Ann Marie Onderko in of her husband Joseph Ondrko who was called to his eternal rest. May his memory be eternal. 

MAY LOTTERY: Mike Sinko report on the May Lottery is as follows:

582 tickets sold = $2910, plus $100 was donated back to the fund which leave a deposit of $3,010. Expenses: Paid out to winners $950, printing of tickets $80 

The profit for this fund raiser is $1,980. Thanks Mike.         

CEMETERY PLOTS: If you have a plot in the parish cemetery or a plot reserved for you or a family member, you should consult the office and with the care taker make sure you know the location and to discuss the amount of burials that can be placed in the existing plot, as sizes of the burial contents have a little different space since the early purchase of the plots. Do not wait until the time of the deceased to locate the burial space. Be prepared.





SECOND  SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST 

22 06 2020

JUNE 14, 2020

Saturday, June 13  

4:00 PM            Conversion of souls under Demonic influence

Sunday, June 14           SECOND  SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST

8:30AM            God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioners       

Saturday, June 20 God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Living Fathers of  SS Peter & Paul U.C.C.  and

4:00 PM ✞Everlasting Life for all Deceased Fathers of the Parish

Sunday, June 21 THIRD SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST

8:30 AM God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioners

Love and trust are the solutions for the worries and frets of life.

Lord, I pray for Your gift of Faith which is all that I need for

Your power to work within me.

WHY THE AMERICAN FLAG IS FOLDED 13 TIMES

Have you ever noticed on TV or at military funerals that the honor guard pays meticulous attention to correctly folding the American flag 13 times?
I’ve known how the 21 gun salute was determined (adding the individual digits of 1776), but only recently learned why the flag was folded 13 times when it is lowered or when it is folded and handed to the widow at the burial of a veteran.
   Here it is:

The first fold of our flag is a symbol of life.
The second fold is a symbol of our belief in eternal life.
The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veterans departing our ranks who gave a portion of their lives for the defense of our country to attain peace

throughout the world.
The fourth fold represents our weaker nature, for as American citizens trusting in God, it is to Him we turn in times of peace as well as in time of war for His divine guidance.
The fifth fold is a tribute to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, “Our Country, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right; but it is still our country, right or wrong.”
The sixth fold is for where our hearts lie. It is with our heart that we pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands,  one Nation under God, indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all.
The seventh fold is a tribute to our Armed Forces, for it is through the Armed Forces that we protect our country and our flag against all her enemies, whether they be found within or without the boundaries of our republic.
The eighth fold is a tribute to the one who entered into the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day, and to honor mother for whom it flies on Mother’s Day.
The ninth fold is a tribute to womanhood; for it has been through their faith, their love, loyalty and devotion that the character of the men and women who have made this country great has been molded.
The tenth fold is a tribute to the father, for he, too, has given his sons and daughters for the defense of our country since they were first born.
The eleventh fold, in the eyes of a Hebrew citizen represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon, and glorifies in their eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. 

The twelfth fold, in the eyes of a Christian citizen, represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in their eyes, God the Father, the Son, and Holy Spirit.
When the flag is completely folded, the stars are uppermost reminding us of our nation’s motto, “In God We Trust.”
After the flag is completely folded and tucked in, it takes on the appearance of a cocked hat, ever reminding us of the soldiers who served under General George Washington, and the sailors and marines who served under Captain John Paul Jones, who were followed by their comrades and shipmates in the Armed Forces of the United States, preserving for us the rights, privileges, and freedoms we enjoy today.
   There are some traditions and ways of doing things, which have deep meaning.

OUR UNITED STATES FLAG

FLY IT WITH PRIDE

On 14 June 1777, the Continental Congress passed the first Flag Act in Philadelphia.  Stars have been added to the flag as new states join the union.  Currently, the flag has 50 stars.  There are thirteen stripes, one for each of the original colonies.  In 1782, the Congress of the Confederation chose these same colors for the Great Seal of the United States and listed the meanings of the colors.

Colors of the Flag

Red = valor, bravery and hardiness
White = purity and innocence
Blue = Vigilance, perseverance, loyalty and justice

Birth of a Holiday

Flag Day became a holiday in New York State in 1897 on June14th.  Gradually, other states joined New York.   In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson established Flag Day by national proclamation. 

The Spirit of Christ

When we come to Church we come in common-union. We pray and express our common needs and hopes which are eternal. Thus we have the Litanies for peace and well being, for our leaders in Church, government, and in general for all those in need. As these litanies are being chanted and the prayers read, we “fill them up” with meaning by including our specific intentions. In this way, our worship is not an isolated experience, but presents eternal life, Heaven. When we gather in worship, we commend ourselves and our whole life to Christ our God. Our whole life is offered to God.

In worship, God accepts the offering of ourselves, and blesses this offering and returns the offering to us changed to His Body and Blood, the Eternal Medicine that cures all illness and even death.  He does not leave us there. Much like the disciples on the Mount of Transfiguration, we return to our daily lives. We have a new vision, a new insight and new strength. We are sent back with the mission to share this and to baptize the world, in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

Each week has a rhythm built into it. For the most part, we go about our individual lives for six days. Then we are gathered as a community in worship where we experience our oneness in Christ. Finally, after being renewed, we are sent out to our daily life, now filled with the Spirit of Christ.

The Feasts of the Church also have an inner harmony. We have fasting periods as preparation times, and these are followed by the celebration of feasts. Each feast singles out one aspect of God’s plan of salvation upon which to concentrate.

We live as Christians with all our senses and we pray with all our senses, especially in our worship. For example, the foods that we eat at Easter time are first blessed in Church. At other times, water, fruits, and flowers are blessed on various feasts. Whenever we are in ill health, or starting an important project, we can seek a special blessing from our Church. In this way there is a steady expression of the need of God and His blessings in our daily lives.  By drawing these special moments or events into our Church, we are offering our whole life to be blessed by God. By making these special events holy times, we are sanctifying or making our whole life holy.

SANCTUARY LIGHT: 

The Sanctuary light is not requested this week June 13-20 

A new Sanctuary Light and the monthly candle charts are available for your requests. The Light will burn for the full week from Saturday to Saturday and the donation is $15. The Monthly Altar Candles burns during all services in the month requested, donation $40. Remember a loved one or a special occasion by having the lights shine for them in Church. 

SYMPATHY: We extend our sincere sympathy to the family of Eugene Slabinski who was called to his eternal rest.  May his memory be eternal.





THIRD SUNDAY OF THE GREAT FAST VENERATION OF THE HOLY CROSS MARCH 15, 2020

25 03 2020

Saturday, March 14
4:00 PM ✞Anna Dempsey – Dempsey Children

Sunday, March 15 THIRD SUNDAY OF THE GREAT FAST
8:30 AM God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioners
4:00 Deanery Stations of the Cross – St. Nicholas, Glen Lyon, PA

Wednesday, March 18
4:00 PM Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts

Saturday, March 21
4:00 PM ✞Nellie Wdowiak – Irene Pstrak & Sons

Sunday, March 22 FOURTH Sunday OF THE GREAT FAST
8:30 AM God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioners
4:00 PM Deanery Stations of the Cross – Holy Transfiguration

VENERATION OF THE HOLY CROSS
LENT IS THE HALF WAY TO EASTER
Today on the Third Sunday of the Great Fast, we venerate the Holy Cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, and we mark the halfway point of Lent. The Cross stands before us today as a reminder of where we are and where we are headed during The Great Fast and the season of growing in holiness prayer, fasting, and almsgiving. By showing us our Crucified Lord Jesus on the Cross today, the Fruit of Eternal Life, the Church announces to us that Holy Week – the week of our Lord’s Passion – is just three weeks away. At the end of the Matins today, the Cross is carried by the priest in procession from the altar to the middle of the church (tetrapod), where the faithful come to kiss and venerate it for the remainder of the week. The following hymn is sung: “To Your Cross O Master, we bow in veneration, and we glorify Your Holy Resurrection!”  (Slavonic: “Krestu Tvoyemu poklanyayemsia, Vladiko, i Svyatoye Voskreseniye Tvoye Slavim!”

THE GLORY OF THE CROSS

Thousands of years have passed since the day,
When my dear Lord died for me; 
For even though I was a mere gleam in His eye,
He knew I would need Calvary.
The pain He endured, the hardships and strife,
Were more than He deserved; 
But Christ made it clear right from the start,
His mission on Earth was to serve.
Though initially welcomed and cheered by the crowds,
The praises soon turned into scorn; 
As they mocked and beat Him so savagely, 
And gave Him a crown of thorns.
He bore the cross upon His back,
Standing in our place; 
Never turning or looking back,
While the tears ran down his face.
Yet it wasn’t the cross, nor was it the scars,
That filled Him with such grief, 
More than this, it was the hearts of those;
Who were hardened in disbelief.
He wept for the lost, the hurting, the blind,
Both present, and yet to be; 
For His only desire both then and now,
Was for His children to truly see.
Shrouded in darkness, not perceiving their Lord,
They watched Him lay down His life; 
While God Himself gave up His Son,
As the ultimate sacrifice.
Today, Christ’s arms are still outstretched,
But no longer upon a tree; 
For each generation that rises up,
He wants to see set free.
Though many hearts are still untouched, 
By what and who He is;

SANCTUARY LIGHT: The Sanctuary light is requested to burn this week March 14 – 21 by Anna Magill in memory of Anna Dempsey by the Dempsey Children.

STATIONS OF THE CROSS: The Deanery Stations of the Cross:
March 22 – 4:00 PM – Transfiguration Of Our Lord, Nanticoke, PA
March 29 – 4:00 PM – St. Vladimir’s, Edwardsville, PA

PUSSY WILLOW BRANCHES: Just a little reminder that Pussy willows will be needed for Palm Sunday, April 5th. They are in bloom in Nanticoke, please check yours.

THANKS: Our thanks to all who participated in the preparation and serving of the Fellowship following the Stations of the Cross last Sunday. We appreciate all the good food, desserts and monetary gifts received to help make the affair a nice occasion. May God’s Blessings be on you.





SECOND SUNDAY OF THE GREAT FAST MARCH 8, 2020

6 03 2020

Saturday, March 7
4:00 PM ✞Mary Ambrose – Rosemarie Kachinko

Sunday, March 8 SECOND SUNDAY OF THE GREAT FAST
8:30 AM God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioner
4:00 PM Deanery Stations of the Cross – SS Peter & Paul, U.C.C.
Plymouth, PA


Wednesday, March 11
4:00 PM Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts

Saturday, March 14
4:00 PM ✞Anna Dempsey – Dempsey Children

Sunday, March 15 THIRD SUNDAY OF THE GREAT FAST
8:30 AM God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioners
4:00 PM Deanery Stations of the Cross – St. Nicholas, Glen Lyon


Take a lesson from your clock.
It passes the time by keeping its little hands busy.

The Prayer of St. Ephraim
O Lord and Master of my life, spare me from the spirit of indifference, despair, lust for power, and idle chatter. Instead, grant to me, your servant, the spirit of wholeness of being, humble-mindedness, patience and love.
O Lord and King, grant me the grace to be aware of my sins and not to judge my brothers; for You are blessed now and forever and ever.  Amen

Lessons on Life
There was a man who had four sons. He wanted his sons to learn not to judge things too quickly. So he sent them each on a quest, in turn, to go and look at a pear tree that was a great distance away.
The first son went in the winter, the second in the spring, the third in summer, and the youngest son in the fall.
When they had all gone and come back, he called them together to describe what they had seen. 
The first son said that the tree was ugly, bent, and twisted.
The second son said no it was covered with green buds and full of promise.
The third son disagreed; he said it was laden with blossoms that smelled so
sweet and looked so beautiful, it was the most graceful thing he had ever seen.
The last son disagreed with all of them; he said it was ripe and drooping with
fruit, full of life and fulfillment.
The man then explained to his sons that they were all right, because they had each seen but only one season in the tree’s life.
He told them that you cannot judge a tree, or a person, by only one season, and that the essence of who they are and the pleasure, joy, and love that come from that life can only be measured at the end, when all the seasons are up.
If you give up when it’s winter, you will miss the promise of your spring, the
beauty of your summer, fulfillment of your fall. 
Moral:
Don’t let the pain of one season destroy the joy of all the rest.
Don’t judge life by one difficult season.
Persevere through the difficult patches and better times are sure to come
some time.
Live Simply. Love Generously. Care Deeply. Speak Kindly.  Leave the Rest to God.
Happiness keeps You Sweet,
Trials keep You Strong,
Sorrows keep You Human,
Failures keep You Humble,
Success keeps You Glowing,
But Only God keeps You Going!

PRAYERS: Please remember in your prayers the sick of the parish..
Always pray to have eyes that see the best,
A heart that forgives the worst,
A mind that forgets the bad,
And a soul that never loses faith.

THE EIGHTBEATITUDES & THEIR MEANINGS
RECITE ONLY THE UNDERLINED.

#1 Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
#2 Blessed are they who mourn, for they will be comforted.
#3 Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the land.
#4 Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be satisfied.
#5 Blessed are the merciful, for they will be shown mercy. (We
#6 Blessed are the clean of heart, for they will see God.
#7 Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God.
#8 Blessed are they who are persecuted for the sake of righteousness, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

REFKECTIONS OF THE BEATITUDES

1 (Be satisfied with what you have. Share the good things we have with others because God wants us to.)
2 (Comfort those who are suffering. Help others feel better about themselves after a loss.)
3 (Humility-a true sense of who you are. Get the ego out of the way.)
4 (Do what is fair for everyone. Think WWJD)
5 (We forgive those who are unkind to us. Look for ways to show kindness to others.)
6 (We do what is right just because we know it is the right thing to do.)
7 (We try to bring God’s peace to the world. We control our behavior so people can see Jesus in us.)
8 (We are willing to stand up for God’s laws even if we are teased or insulted.)

Second Sunday of Lent
The second Sunday of Lent is called “Sunday of the palsied Man.” Men must repent for their sins. If they want to be forgiven Christ cannot heal our soul if we do not repent for having offended God by our iniquities. The Church leads us in pious exercises of prayer and fasting because our weakness can be healed by them.

SECOND SUNDAY OF THE GREAT FAST
On this day we celebrate the memory of our holy father Gregory Palamas, Archbishop of Thessalonica

WELCOME FATHER MAKAR FOR THE SERVICES THIS WEEKEND.

SANCTUARY LIGHT: No Request

STATIONS OF THE CROSS: Our Parish will be the host for the Deanery Stations of the Cross this Sunday and fellowship afterward. It would be nice to see our parishioners attending this Lenten Service.

MAY LOTTERY: The May Lottery tickets are available and you are asked to be cooperative in buying and trying to sell some of the tickets.

Happy Birthday Father Walter. May God bless you with many more Happy, Healthy Years. Mnohya Lita!

LUC MEETING: The North Anthracite Council of the LUC will meet on Thursday, March 12, 2020 at 6:00pm at Grotto Pizza, Edwardsville. Discussion will include the March 27 to 29 Lenten Retreat at St. Mary’s Villa Spiritual Center, Sloatsburg, NY; the May 16 bus trip to New York City; and, the September 2020 National Convention in Upstate New York hosted by the Niagara Frontier Council. A warm invitation is extended to all parishioners of our Anthracite Deanery to become members of the LUC to further the richness and beauty of our Ukrainian Greek Catholic heritage. For further information contact Janina Everett, Membership Coordinator

TIME CHANGE: Remember to turn your clocks forward one hour thisSunday, at 2:00 AM. This is the beginning of Day Light Saving Time

LENTEN RETREAT: A Spiritual Lenten Retreat, Sponsored by the League of Ukrainian Catholics will be held March 27 – 29, 2020 at St. Mary’s Villa, Sloatsburg, NY. Retreat Master Msyr. Martin Canavan. Director of Spiritual Formation at St. Basil Seminary, Stanford, CT. Fee is $180 which includes meals, room and program. Contact Marion Hrubec





FIRST SUNDAY OF THE GREAT FAST MARCH 1, 2020

6 03 2020

Saturday, Feb. 29 Good’s Blessings for good health
4:00 PM Father Stephen Saffron
Sunday, March 1 FIRST SUNDAY OF THE GREAT FAST
8:30 AM God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioner
4:00 PM STATIONS OF THE CROSS – SS Peter & Paul, Wilkes-Barre, PA


Wednesday, March 4
4:00 PM Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts
Saturday, March 7
4:00 PM ✞ Mary Ambrose – Rosemarie Kachinko
Sunday, March 8 SECOND SUNDAY OF THE GREAT FAST
8:30 AM God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioners
4:00 PM Deanery Stations of the Cross – SS Peter & Paul, U.C.C. Plymouth, PA

LENTEN RETREAT
There will be a Lenten Retreat on Saturday and Sunday March 7th and 8th here in Ss. Peter and Paul, Plymouth.  Fr. Paul Makar, the Pastor of St. Nicholas in Minersville, PA and Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Middleport, PA, will visit Ss. Peter and Paul and celebrate the Divine Liturgy.  The “retreat” will part of the liturgy and will in essence be a longer homily than you are normally accustomed to receiving.  As we have no “extra” priests available to provide our parish a Lenten Retreat, Fr. Paul Makar and I have agreed to swap parish assignments for this weekend so he could give you a Lenten Retreat and I could provide a Lenten Retreat for his parishes.  Please give him a warm welcome as you do with all visitors to our parish.  For the Stations of the Cross at 4 p.m. on Sunday, I fully expect to return in time for this and the reception that will follow.

THE SUNDAY OF ORTHODOXY

The first Sunday of the Great Fast is called the Sunday of Orthodoxy. What do we mean by “orthodoxy”? The word “orthodoxy” stems from the Greek word “orthodoxia” (orthos=right; doksa=opinion) which signifies the true faith and the true worship of God. We are not speaking here of orthodoxy as we understand it today as being separated from Rome, but orthodoxy, as applied to the whole Church of Christ until the schism when Rome left behing the other 4 Patriarchates, which occurred in the eleventh century during patriarchate of Cerularius (1054). The orthodoxy that we celebrate this Sunday is catholic (universal) orthodoxy, professed by the entire Church of Christ of the first centuries in the battle against the heresy of Iconoclasm (Gr – eikon=image; klastes=a breaker; – an image breaking heresy). Because God became man, the Son of God took on flesh we can write icons and depict the Son of God in image. The Sunday of Orthodoxy is a festival for the whole Church, both Eastern and Western. It is the festive celebration of the decisive victory over Iconoclasm and other heresies.
The purpose of this feast is to pay solemn public homage and veneration to Jesus Christ, the Blessed Mother of God, and all the Saints in image.
The Church of Christ deeply respects and honors the holy icons as it also does holy relics. She places them in church for public veneration and recommends that we venerate them privately in our homes, and wear small icons around our necks in the form of little crosses or medals because these are windows into heaven and Jesus and the saints are present to us in iconography (via proxy).

SUNDAY OF ORTHODOXY
 We remember the restoration of icons and we venerate to the holy icons of the Son of God, Jesus Christ, the Most Blessed and Ever Virgin Mother of God Mary, and all the Saints.

THE GREAT FAST
Although our time has brought with it many changes in traditions, and discipline, and the bishops have relaxed the rules for fasting, including the Great Fast, nevertheless, the Forty Days Fast still has massive importance for our spiritual life. For various reasons, today we can still fast as our ancestors did even though bishops may not direct you to; yet even today we are still obliged to fast – that is, we are obliged to refrain from sin, and from giving in to our evil inclinations. We are also obliged to pray and to practice virtue and good deeds. In reality then, the most important goal of the Great Fast is our spiritual growth.
The Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts:
A typical Lenten service is the Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts. Already in the first centuries there was a custom during the Forty Days Fast to omit the celebration of the Divine Liturgy because, at that time, it was still linked with agape, that is the love banquet, and this was not in keeping with the spirit of fasting. Furthermore, the Divine Liturgy is regarded as joyful mystery; for this reason, its celebration was limited to Saturdays and Sundays. On the other days of the week to give the faithful an opportunity to receive Holy Communion, the Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts developed which is Vespers with Communion added. Actually, this is not a Divine Liturgy in the sense of the word, for it does not have the consecration of bread and wine, the Anaphora; but rather, it is a Vespers service with the distribution Holy Communion, the Body and Blood of Christ reserved since Sunday, from which the bread was consecrated and became Christ! Hence, the name of Presanctified Gifts.
The Council of Laodicia (c.364) prescribed: “It is not permitted during the Great Fast to offer up the Bread (that is the Holy Liturgy), except on Saturday and Sunday” (rule 49). The Sixth Ecumenical Council of Trullo (691) decreed: “On all the days of the Great Fast, with the exception of Saturday and Sunday, and the feast of the Annunciation, the Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts must be celebrated. “ (rule 52).

SUNDAY LITURGIES DURING LENT:
WHY DO THEY SEEM LONGER?

Our Byzantine Church prescribes that the Liturgy of St. Basil the Great is to be celebrated on all of the Sundays of Lent, instead of the Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, which is celebrated throughout the rest of the church year.  St.
Basil’s Anaphora prayers are older and has longer priestly prayers than the St. John Chrysostom Liturgy (which was derived from the Liturgy of St. Basil the Great), and is celebrated ten times during the church year:  the five Sundays of Lent (not Palm Sunday), Holy Thursday, Holy Saturday, Christmas Eve, Epiphany Eve, and on the actual Feast of St. Basil which we celebrate on January 1.
SANCTUARY LIGHT: NO REQUEST.
WOMEN’S SOCIETY: The date has been changed again for the next Women’s Society meeting. The meeting will be held on Tuesday, March 3rd at 11:00 AM in the church hall. This is necessary due to the fact that the Hall must be prepared for the Fellowship serving after the Stations of the Cross on Sunday, March 8th. Please try to be present as you are needed to set up for this occasion.
DESSERTS: We ask our great dessert makers to help with the serving of fellowship on Sunday, March 8th after the Stations of the Cross. Your contribution or any dessert you wish to donate will be greatly appreciated.

BIRTHDAY GREETINGS; Father Walter will celebrate his Birthday on Saturday, March 7th. May God grant him many more Happy, Healthy Years. Mnohya Lita!

CALENDAR LOTTERY: It is time for our May Lottery tickets. Mike Sinko had the tickets printed and ready for distribution. Please, if you can take a few to sell it would be a great help as we are missing a few of our sellers. Ask your family and friends to purchase a chance to win.

TIME CHANGE: It is time to spring forward. Turn you clocks forward one hour next Sunday, March 8th at 2:00 AM. This is the beginning of Day Light Saving Time.

LUC MEETING: The North Anthracite Council of the LUC will meet on Thursday, March 12, 2020 at 6:00pm at Grotto Pizza, Edwardsville. Discussion will include the March 27 to 29 Lenten Retreat at St. Mary’s Villa Spiritual Center, Sloatsburg, NY; the May 16 bus trip to New York City; and, the September 2020 National Convention in Upstate New York hosted by the Niagara Frontier Council. A warm invitation is extended to all parishioners of our Anthracite Deanery to become members of the LUC to further the richness and beauty of our Ukrainian Greek Catholic heritage. For further information contact Janina Everett, Membership Coordinator,





SUNDAY OF CHEESFARE FEBRUARY 23, 2020

26 02 2020

Saturday, February 22
4:00 PM ✞Michael Hubiack – his wife Louise Hubiack

Sunday, February 23 SUNDAY OF CHEESEFARE
8:30 AM God’s Blessing and Good Health for all parishioners.



Wednesday, February 26
4;00 PM Liturgy of the PRESANCTIFIED GIFTS

Saturday, February 29 Good’s Blessings for good health
4:00 PM Father Stephen Saffron

Sunday, March 1 FIRST SUNDAY OF THE GREAT FAST
8:30AM God’s Blessing and Good Health for all parishioners
4:00 PM Deanery Stations of the Cross at SS Peter & Paul UCC, Wilkes-Barre, PA

The Purpose of the Great Fast
Although our time has brought with it many changes in church practice and discipline, and the Second Vatican Council fathers have relaxed the rules for fasting, including the Great Fast, Nevertheless, the Forty Days Fast still has significance for our spiritual life. For various reasons, today we may be unable to fast in the same way as we did in our youth; yet even today we are obliged to fast – that is, we are obliged to refrain from sin, and from giving in to our evil inclinations. We are also obliged to pray and to practice virtue and good deeds. In reality then, the most important goal of the Great Fast is our spiritual renewal.

Fast from judging others;
Feast on seeing the best in people.
Fast from emphasis on differences;
Feast on the unity of life.

Fast from despair;
Feast on hope.
Fast from thoughts of illness;
Feast on the healing power of God.

Fast from words that destroy;
Feast on phrases that are encouraging.
Fast from discontent;
Feast on gratitude.

Fast from anger;
Feast on patience.
Fast from being negative;
Feast on being positive.

Fast from worry;
Feast on trust.
Fast from complaining;
Feast on appreciation.

Fast from hostility;
Feast on peacemaking.
Fast from bitterness;
Feast on forgiveness.

Fast from constant activity;
Feast on slowing down.
Fast from disrespect;
Feast on recognizing the sacred in all life.

Fast from self-concern;
Feast on compassion for others.
~Author Unknown~

Un-forgiveness

Nothing is as painful,
As un-forgiveness to the soul;
A heart that’s torn asunder,
With forgiveness becomes whole.
A single kind word spoken
Means more than countless words;
The three words, “I forgive you,”
Are all that need be heard.
To a soul that has been wounded,
Like a healing, cooling balm;
Forgiveness soothes and comforts,
Till at last the soul is calm.

For the soul that seeks forgiveness,
When forgiveness can’t be found;
It struggles vainly everyday,
To hear that simple sound.
The power in those three kind words,
Can heal a heart that’s broken;
But that heart cannot begin to heal,
As long as words remain unspoken.
Compassion in its purest sense,
Reside in those three words;
The three words, “I forgive you,”
Are all that need be heard

SUNDAY OF CHEESEFARE
FEBRUARY 23, 2020

FORGIVENESS SUNDAY

THE CEREMONY OF FORGIVENESS
CHEESEFARE SUNDAY
In ancient times in Eastern monasteries a beautiful custom existed in which the rite of mutual forgiveness on Cheesefare Sunday was performed. This rite of forgiveness was carried out in the evening, following a modest repast. All the monks in the presence of the faithful asked pardon of one another for past offences, then embraced, and gave each other the kiss of peace. The faithful did the same among themselves. In some places, while this rite of forgiveness was being carried out, the stichera of the Pasch (Resurrection) was sung: “Today the sacred Pasch has been shown forth to us…” The last stichera ends with an appeal for mutual forgiveness: “and let us embrace one another and say: ‘Brethren’ even to those who hate us, and let us forgive all things…” The singing of the sticheras of the Pasch (Resurrection) was to signify that just as during the season of Pasch or Eastertide, so now at the threshold of the Great Fast we should mutually ask pardon for offences for the sake of Christ who fasted, suffered, and rose for our sake.
This very moving rite of forgiveness was still observed at the Kievan Pecherska Lavra until the Communists took over the government. Here also, the monks first had a meager pre-Lenten repast, after which all superiors and monks donned their mantles and proceeded to the church. All the superiors of the Lavra, from the highest to the lowest, stood side by side in the middle of the church and the whole monastic community, consisting of several hundred members, one by one approached the superiors, then kneeling, they kissed each other three times while saying, “Forgive me, Father,” or Forgive me Brother.” During this time, the choir sang the stichera taken from the solemn Vespers of Cheesefare Sunday: “Adam sat opposite paradise bewailing his nakedness…” After the completing of the ceremony, all present departed in silence.
Truly, these four pre-Lenten Sundays have a deep significance for our spiritual life. For whoever beats his breast as did the Publican and learns humility from his example; whoever learns from the parable of the Prodigal Son to trust in God’s mercy; whoever on Meatfare Sunday, after meditation on the Terrible Judgment, is seized with fear of God’s justice, which fell so severely upon our First Parents, as we have seen in the service of Cheesefare Sunday – for him that fast will not be so terrible. Rather, he will understand that it is necessary for his heart and soul. He will willingly fast and make
Prostrations, knowing that fasting and sorrow for sins can best prepare him for the feast of the Resurrection of our Lord.

SANCTUARY LIGHT: The Sanctuary Light NO REQUEST

PYSANKY WORKSHOP: Ss. Cyril and Methodius Ukrainian Catholic Church, Olyphant, PA will be offering the Ukrainian Pysanky Egg Workshop for beginners. The Tradition of the pysanky and passing on the knowledge is ongoing at St. Cyrils for over 10 years of classes. This event is held at St. Cyril’s Hall, 207 River Street, Olyphant. Dates available are Sunday, March 1, and Sunday, March 15, 2020, This BEGINNERS class will start at 2:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. (2 HOURS) at $20.00 per person (Includes all the supplies). Space is limited and reservations are needed. Call today Mrs. Sonia Masla. Call Tammy Maslar Budnovitch after 5:00 p.m.

PIGGIE DINNER: Saints Peter & Paul Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, Wilkes- Barre will hold a take-out Piggie / Holubtsi Dinner this Sunday, February 23rd, 2020.  Dinners may be picked up between 11:30 am and 2:00 pm at the Parish School Hall, corner of North River and West Chestnut Streets, Wilkes-Barre.  Dinner includes Piggies (meat stuffed cabbage), mashed potatoes, vegetable, bread and butter and dessert.  Dinners will be $12.00 for adults and $7.00 for children (12 and under).  Walk-Ins Welcome but Reservations are encouraged.

Hoagie Sale St. Nicholas in Glen Lyon, Thursday March 5th, 11 am to 5pm. Vegetable soup and turkey or Italian hoagie and bake sale. $6.00 for hoage and $6.00 for a quart of soup. Order by calling Debbie by Sunday March 1st.

Forgiveness is a wonderful way to lift yourself up and it is the best way to encourage yourself and others to do better.
Lord, grant me greater understanding and wisdom so that I can move past my problems into a new day.





SUNDAY OF MEAT – FARE FEBRUARY 16, 2020

26 02 2020

Saturday, Feb. 15
4:00 PM ✞Catherine Papula – Mike & Dolores Sinko

Sunday, Feb. 16 SUNDAY OF MEATFARE
8:30 AM God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioners
❄❄❄❄❄❄❄❄❄
Saturday, Feb. 22
4:00 PM ✞Michael Hubiak – Louise Hubiak, wife

Sunday, Feb. 23 CHEESEFARE SUNDAY
8:30 AM God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioners
3:00 PM FORGIVENESS SUNDAY SERVICES at
SS Cyril & Methodius Church, Berwick, PA
The Great Fast begins at Sundown.
☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸☸

The 2020 schedule for the Wyoming Valley Laymen Lenten Sunday Stations of the Cross
SUNDAY, MARCH 1 SS PETER AND PAUL, WILKES-BARRE, PA
SUNDAY, MARCH 8 SS PETER AND PAUL, PLYMOUTH, PA
SUNDAY, MARCH 15 ST. NICHOLAS, GLEN LYON, PA
SUNDAY, MARCH 22 TRANSFIGURATION, NANTICOKE, PA
SUNDAY, MARCH 29 ST. VLADIMIR’S, EDWARDSVILL, PA

SUNDAY OF MEAT-FARE

The Sunday of Meat-fare is also called the Sunday of the Terrible Judgment. In the Gospel today, Christ speaks of the Terrible Judgment, of the reward of the righteous, and the eternal punishment of the wicked. By recalling the manner in which the Terrible Judgment will be carried out, this service is designed to fill us with salutary fear, sorrow for our sins, and to stress the importance of good works, especially works of mercy.
No one shall escape this Judgment. All our deeds will be exposed and rewarded or punished. This is clear from the following stichera, “The books will be opened and the acts of men will be revealed before the unbearable judgment seat; the whole vale of sorrow shall echo with the fearful sound of lamentation, as all the sinners, weeping in vain, are sent by your just judgment to everlasting torment.
Therefore, we beseech you, O compassionate and loving Lord: Spare us who sing your praise, for you alone are rich in mercy.”
“The trumpets shall blow, the graves shall be opened and all men shall rise, their souls being reunited with their finished bodies, trembling greatly, moaning and shaking, as they are separated from the elect and sent to suffering. Therefore, O Lord of glory, be compassionate toward us and make us worthy to be counted among those who love You.”
Everyone shall appear at the Terrible Judgment where there shall be no respect for persons, as the following hymn of the canon of the Matins service of that Sunday makes clear: “The day is approaching, already at the door is the judgment! O Soul, where kings and princes, the rich and the poor gather, where all people shall be judged and receive according to their deeds.”

The practice of the holy great fast

The time of the Great Fast is for every Christian, a time for spiritual combat, in which the soul and body are engaged. The soul engages in this combat by praying and meditating more fervently, keeping watch over the senses; by practicing the virtues and by doing good works. This interior disposition of the soul is manifested outwardly in our body through corporal acts of fasting and penance. There is no spiritual fasting without mortification of the body. “The more you subtract from the body,” says St. Basil the Great, “the more brightness of spiritual health you will add to the soul. For it is not by increasing bodily strength, but by perseverance and patient endurance in trial that we gain strength against the invisible enemies.”
The traditional practice of The Fast in the Church is carried out in two ways; either by total abstinence from all food and drink for a certain period of time, that is fasting in the strict sense of the word; or, by abstaining from certain foods only for a certain period of time, and this kind of fasting is called abstinence.
The greatest relaxation of all fasts in the whole Catholic Church came after the Second Vatican Council. Following the directives of this Council, our Ukrainian Catholic Bishops together with the Major Archbishop Cardinal Joseph Slipyj approved the relaxation of all fasts for our Church, including the Forty Days Fast. A decree on fasting issued by Major Archbishop Joseph in 1966 prescribed that all the faithful are bound to abstain from meat on all the Fridays of the year. Besides this, they are also bound to abstain from meat and dairy products on the first day of Lent and on Great Friday.
This decree also reminds all the faithful of the continuing obligation of prayer, mortification and the cultivation of the spiritual life: “let all these great relaxations,” the final words of the decree states, “be at the same time a strong incentive and encouragement to repent and to avoid sin and offences against God. Let all faithful Christians remember that the prayer has become silent, the practice of fasting has disappeared, and even the memory of it is forgotten. Therefore, let the relaxed fast increase our zeal in prayer, meditation and participation in divine services, almsgiving, labor, frequent Confessions and Holy Communions.”

SANTUARY LIGHT: NO REQUEST THIS WEEK.

TO ORDER FLOWERS: If you wish to order flowers for any occasion, please let the office know and we will order them from Kettler’s Florist. Any size from $30 can be arranged.

PIGGIE DINNER: Saints Peter & Paul Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, Wilkes- Barre will hold a take-out Piggie / Holubtsi Dinner on Sunday, February 23rd, 2020.  Dinners may be picked up between 11:30 am and 2:00 pm at the Parish School Hall, corner of North River and West Chestnut Streets, Wilkes-Barre.  Dinner includes Piggies (meat stuffed cabbage), mashed potatoes, vegetable, bread and butter and dessert.  Dinners will be $12.00 for adults and $7.00 for children (12 and under).  Walk-Ins Welcome but Reservations are encouraged, call (570)829-3051.

Myasopusna 2020: Transfiguration of Our Lord Church Myasopusna festival will be held in the church banquet hall (in Nanticoke) this Sunday, February 16, from 12:30 to 2:00 PM. Dinner tickets are $15 at the door.

WOMEN’S SOCIETY: The regular monthly meeting will convene in March. Our parish is the host for Stations of the Cross on Sunday, March 8, 2020 and the meeting will be moved up to Thursday, March 5th at 11:00 AM instead of the regular Tuesday, March 10, because preparations must be made for the Fellowship after the Stations. This is a reminder so that you can please plan to attend the March 5th meeting to help with the set up for the Sunday Stations of the Cross. Your help is needed for this affair.





SUNDAY OF THE PRODIGAL SON FEBRUARY 9, 2020

26 02 2020

Saturday, Feb. 8
4:00 PM ✞Rosemary Piston – George & Alice Royston

Sunday, Feb. 9 SUNDAY OF THE PRODIGAL SON
8:30 AM God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioners

Saturday, Feb. 15 All Souls Service – Transfiguration of Our Lord, Nanticoke 8:00 AM

Saturday, Feb. 15
4:00 PM ✞Cathereine Papula – Mike & Dolores Sinko

Sunday, Jan. 16 SUNDAY OF MEATFARE
8:30 AM God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioners

Why Did Jesus Fold the Napkin?
Why did Jesus fold the cloth covering his face after His resurrection? I never noticed this before…. The Gospel of John (20:7) reads that the napkin, which was placed over the face of Jesus, was not just thrown aside. John takes an entire verse to tell us that the napkin was neatly folded, and was placed at the head of that stony coffin.  Early Sunday morning, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene came to the tomb and found that the stone had been rolled away from the entrance.  She ran and found Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved.  She said, ‘They have taken the Lord’s body out of the tomb, and I don’t know where they have put him!’  Peter and the other disciple ran to the tomb to see. The other disciple out ran Peter and got there first. He stopped, looked in and saw the linen cloth lying there, but didn’t go in. Then Simon Peter arrived and went inside. He also noticed the linen wrappings lying there, while the cloth that had covered Jesus’ head was folded up and lying to the side
Was that important? Absolutely!  Is it really significant?  Yes!
In order to understand the significance of the folded napkin, you have to understand a little bit about Hebrew tradition.
The folded napkin had to do with the Master and Servant, and every Jewish boy knew this.  When the servant set the dinner table for the master, he made sure that it was exactly the way the master wanted it.  The table was furnished perfectly, and then the servant would wait, just out of sight, until the master had finished eating, and the servant would not dare touch that table, until the master was finished..  Now if the master were done eating, he would rise from the table, wipe his fingers, his mouth, and clean his beard, and would wad up that napkin and toss it onto the table. The servant would then know to clear the table.  For in those days, the wadded napkin meant, “I’m finished…” But if the master got up from the table, and folded his napkin, and laid it beside his plate, the servant would not dare touch the table, because……….
The folded napkin meant,
“I’m coming back!”

Happy Valentine’s Day

Sunday of the Prodigal Son

The second step in preparing for Easter is repentance for one’s sins. The Church presents the example of the Prodigal Son, teaching her children that all sins can be forgiven, if the sinner recognizes them, is sorry for having offended God, turns away from his sin, goes to confession, and resolves to amend his life. Then the confession is finished with the Heavenly Banguet, Holy Communion, the body and blood of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!

This Sunday of the Prodigal Son
This Sunday portrays in beautifully poetic fashion the wayward son, the nostalgic longing of the sinful soul for God. Its misery and sorrow over its fall, its sincere contrition and repentance, and merciful love of the heavenly Father. And where there is sorrow for sin and repentance there one will find the ever generous mercy of God to which the following stichera of Solemn Vespers sings praises:
“Let us, brothers and sisters, learn the meaning of this mystery: When the Prodigal Son renounced his sinful life and retuned to his father’s house, the all good father ran out to meet him, kissed him, and again restored him to his glory. And he prepared a banquet by killing the fatted calf, which is a mystery to the inhabitants of heaven, so that we may worthily dwell with the Father, Lover of Mankind, who killed the calf, and with the Sacrifice – the Savior of our souls.

 

SANCTUARY LIGHT: NO REQUESTS

VESPERS FOR FORGIVENESS SUNDAY: Remember the date for the services to be held at SS Cyril & Methodius Church, Warren St., Berwick, PA on Sunday, February 23 at 4:00PM

The 2020 schedule for the Wyoming Valley Laymen Lenten Sunday Stations of the Cross
SUNDAY, MARCH 1 SS PETER AND PAUL, WILKES-BARRE, PA
SUNDAY, MARCH 8 SS PETER AND PAUL, PLYMOUTH, PA
SUNDAY, MARCH 15 ST. NICHOLAS, GLEN LYON, PA
SUNDAY, MARCH 22 TRANSFIGURATION, NANTICOKE, PA
SUNDAY, MARCH 29 ST. VLADIMIR’S, EDWARDSVILL, PA





SUNDAY OF THE PUBLICAN & PHARISEE FEBRUARY 2, 2020

26 02 2020

Saturday, February 1 SUNDAY OF THE PUBLICAN & PHARISEE
ENCOUNTER OF OUR LORD AND SAVIOR
Anointing of Holy Oil – Myrovania –
BLESSING OF CANDLES
4:00 PM ✞ John & Anna Rudeski – Onderko & Rudeski Families

Sunday, February 2 SUNDAY OF THE PUBLICAN & PHARISEE
8:30 AM God’s Blessing and Good Health on all parishioners.
ENCOUNTER OF OUR LORD AND SAVIOR
Anointing with Holy Oil – Myrovania
BLESSING OF CANDLES

Thursday, February 6
9:00 AM ✞Lev Szumskyj – – Ulana Campbell
Saturday, February 8
4:00 PM ✞Rosemary Piston – George & Alice Royston
Sunday, February 9 SUNDAY OF THE PRODIGAL SON
8:30AM God’s Blessing and Good Health on all parishioners

The 2020 schedule for the Wyoming Valley Laymen Lenten Sunday Stations of the Cross
3:30pm Confessions 4pm Stations
Fellowship Social afterwards March 15 St. Nicholas, Glen Lyon
March 1 Ss Peter & Paul,   Wilkes-Barre March 22 Transfiguration, Nanticoke
March 8.  SS Peter Paul, Plymouth March 29 St. Vladimir’s, Edwardsville

The Presentation is a feast Commemorating the offering and Dedication of the Infant Jesus by His Mother Mary and St. Joseph to God’s service in accordance with the law that all first-born males of the Jewish people were to be dedicated to God’s service. Since God had chosen the tribe of Aaron to serve the Temple, all had to be redeemed by a ransom. Rich people paid with a lamb, the poor ones the first-born males of the other tribes had to offer two doves or two quails as a ransom. Joseph and Mary were poor, therefore they offered two doves.
Saint Simeon, a holy man lived in the temple of Jerusalem waiting for the Messias. God promised that he would not die without seeing the newly-born Messias. He received Jesus into his arms, and he called, therefore, “Boho-preiemets.” There was also a pious widow Anna. She saw the Messias and announced His coming in Jerusalem. She is, therefore, called prophetess
The feast of the Presentation was introduced in the third century. In the sixth century it spread throughout the whole Church. During the reign of Emperor Justinian l (483-565) a terrible earthquake harassed the Byzantine Empire. The sea also flooded the continent. Special devotions in honor of the Mother of God were instituted. The prayer was answered and the feast of the Presentation was ratified as a reminder of Mary’s protection over the Church and its faithful.
On this feast candles are blessed. Parishioners use the blessed candles in their homes as a sacramental.

SANTUARY LIGHT: The Sanctuary Light is not requested until March, available weeks for your requests.
ALTAR CANDLES: The Months of January and February Altar Candles were requested by Mr. & Mrs. John Bosak in memory of all deceased members of the Bosak Families.

FORGIVENESS SUNDAY: The Deanery Forgiveness Sunday date has been set for Sunday, February 23, 2020, 3:00 PM at SS Cyril & Methodius Church in Berwick, PA.

Prayers requested for the Health of Sister Evhenia, MSMG
Mother Maria, MSMG informs us that Sister Evhenia, MSMG will be undergoing spinal surgery today, Tuesday, January 28 at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia.
Kindly remember Sister Evhenia in your prayers as you ask the Supreme Physician of our souls and bodies to bless her with a speedy recovery.