THE THEOPHANY OF OUR LORD JANUARY 6, 2013

9 01 2013

Saturday, Jan. 5 THEOPHANY OF OUR LORD – Blessing of Holy Water
4:00 PM Helen Rundle – Mary Ann Kachinko
Anointing of Holy Oil – Myrovania

Sunday, Jan. 6 THEOPHANY OF OUR LORD
8:30 AM Compline Litya Service – Divine Liturgy
God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioners
Anointing of Holy Oil – Myrovania
5:00 PM UKRAINIAN HOLY SUPPER

Thursday, Jan. 10
9:00 AM Mary Tomasik – Kopinski Family

Saturday, Jan. 12
4:00 PM Anna Soppeck – Daughter Dolores & Paul Hoover

Sunday, Jan. 13 SUNDAY AFTER THE THEOPHANY
8:30 AM God’s Blessings and Good Health for all Parishioners

IT’S ANOTHER NEW YEAR……BUT FOR WHAT REASON?
“Happy New Year!” That greeting will be said and heard for at least the first couple of weeks, as a new year gets under way. But the day celebrated as New Year’s Day in modern America was not always January 1.

ANCIENT NEW YEARS
The celebration of the new year is the oldest of all holidays. It was first observed in ancient Babylon about 4000 years ago. In the years around 2000 BC, the Babylonian New Year began with the first New Moon (actually the first visible crescent) after the Vernal Equinox (first day of spring).
The beginning of spring is a logical time to start a new year. After all, it is the season of rebirth, of planting new crops, and of blossoming. January 1, on the other hand, has no astronomical or agricultural significance. It is purely arbitrary.
The Babylonian New Year celebration lasted for eleven days. Each day had its own particular mode of celebration, but it is safe to say that modern New Year’s Eve festivities pale in comparison.
The Romans continued to observe the New Year in late March, but various emperors continually tampered with their calendar so that the calendar soon became out of synchronization with the sun.
In order to set the calendar right, the Roman senate, in 153 BC, declared January 1 to be the beginning of the New Year. But tampering continued until Julius Caesar, in 46 BC, established what has come to be known as the Julian calendar. It again established January 1 as the New Year. But in order to synchronize the calendar with the sun, Caesar had to let the previous year drag on for 445 days.

THE CHURCH’S VIEW OF NEW YEAR CELEBRATIONS
Although in the first centuries AD the Romans continued celebrating the new year, the early Catholic Church condemned the festivities as paganism. But as Christianity became more widespread, the early church began having its own religious observances concurrently with many of the pagan celebrations, and New Year’s Day was no different. New Years is still observed as the Feast of Christ’s Circumcision by some denominations. During the Middle Ages, the Church remained opposed to celebrating New Years. January 1 has been celebrated as a holiday by Western nations for only about the past 400 years.

SANCTUARY LIGHT: The Sanctuary light is requested to burn this week Jan. 5 – 12 by Michael & Dolores Sinko in memory of mother Helen Kurkoski.

ALTAR CANDLES: The Altar Candles will burn during all services in the month of January in memory of Thomas & Irene Gerzarowski requested by their daughter Sandy Gerzarowski.

BUILDING FUND: The donations of $300 received in the collection from Dec. 22/23, 2012 in memory of Frank Dempsey: Paul & Marion Rose, Nancy Palumbo, McDaniels, Piscorik & Drumward Families, Barbara & Al McLavich, Michaelene & Paul Wychak, Janice Schuh, Maureen Finnegan, Johanna & Robert Longenberger, Dempsey Family.
Our thanks and appreciation for the donations received toward our Building & Improvement Fund.

BLESSING OF HOMES: If you would like to have your home blessed please place your name, address and phone number in the collection basket or Father can be reached at 735-2262. Father would be pleased if everyone requested to this blessing.. This is a yearly event and if at all possible you should bless your home.

MALANKA – Northeastern Pennsylvania’s Ukrainian New Year 9th Annual Dinner Dance –is scheduled for Friday evening, January 11, 2013 from 6:00pm to 1:00am at St. Vladimir Parish Center, Scranton. Tickets are $40.00 per person. For reservations or additional information contact Ann Beshada at 829-4202

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